Pettersson und Findus – Das schönste weihnachten überhaupt (Pettersson and Findus)

“Pettersson and Findus” is a German Christmas film from 2016 based on the Picture book series “Pettson and Findus” by the beloved Swedish author Sven Nordqvist.
This lovely little film is a combination of live action and animation done so beautifully that even the adults will for a second forget that it is not really real. The movie, despite being German, has that beautiful Scandinavian old-fashioned charm with shabby wooden furniture painted blue, wool and felt clothing, home-weaved rugs, and of course the typical red and evergreen Christmas.

Pettersson and Findus is definitely a film for the smallest children, but adults can enjoy the little details the kids won’t pick up, like the atmospheric sceneries, the vintage interior decor and the overall sweet and cozy charm. This movie is, to me, the very definition of the Scandinavian concept of Hygge.

The story is about farmer Pettersson who lives alone with his cat Findus in a little cottage in the Swedish countryside. It is the day before Christmas and Findus has decided that this is going to be the best Christmas ever. It is up to Pettersson to make this wish come true. But Pettersson has one problem, he is not very good at accepting help, so when he falls and sprains his foot, it is looking rather bleak for Findus and his dream Christmas. Will Findus be able to convince Pettersson to accept the help he needs or will he have to come to terms with the fact that this Christmas might not become everything he has dreamed it to be.

I love the humble lessons in this film, how we must learn to not just help others, but also accept help ourselves sometimes. And how the biggest magic is often not the kind you can buy for money, but is rather found in the wonders and splendor of nature and in the love of friend.

This magical film is, as mentioned before, best suited the smallest children, but adults with a special love for Christmas, vintage and nostalgia will definitely love it too. To me, this film is a breath of fresh air in an industry dominated by commercialism and sameness. If you want to watch something different than your regular Christmas blockbusters I definitely recommend this gem of a film.

Of course, five out of five stars! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

P.S This movie is available on Netflix 🎅🏼❤️🎅🏼❤️🎅🏼❤️

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Christmas Story (Joulutarina)

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Christmas story (Joulutarina) is a Finnish Christmas film from 2007 telling the legend of the man we call Santa Claus. There are many films made with the same plot, but this little quiet beautiful film is very different from the rest.

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The story is about little Nikolas who become an orphan after his parents and baby sister are killed in an accident. The people in the village are poor and none of the families can afford to take Nikolas in permanently, so they decide to let him stay for a year with each family in the village. After each year is over Nikolas, on Christmas Eve, gives a gift he has made him self for the family he has stayed with. One year the village has so little food that none can afford to take Nikolas in, so he is apprenticed to the stern and gloomy carpenter who lives outside the village. Nikolas is made to work hard, but he enjoys the work and has soon warmed the cold heart of the carpenter. Nikolas continues the tradition of giving gifts to the village children, and to his surprise, the old carpenter decides to help him.

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This movie is the most esthetically beautiful film I have ever seen in my life. The gorgeous Finnish landscape is breathtaking, and consequently the elegant cinematography unfolds like a dream. The film was shot on the tundra in Utsjoki in Lapland on the border to Norway, and most of the film is showing fairy-like winter scenes. The movie is a declaration of Love to the Finnish-Sami landscape, a true, pure, natural winter wonderland.

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What I love the most about this amazing film is how uncommercial and non-materialistic it is. I feel so many of the more popular Christmas movies, especially about Santa Claus, is just one big sentimental materialistic bonanza, more about the magic of toys and presents than that of Christmas. In “Christmas Story” you will find wax candles instead of flashing LED lights, snow-clad evergreens instead of lavishly decorated Christmas trees, little wooden horses instead of store-bought robots and Legoes. The movie is not only about Christmas, it is about healing from loss, finding new meaning in giving love to gain it, it is about finding hope in unexpected places, and kindness and generosity as a cure for loneliness.

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This movie is definitely on my top five list of my all-time favorite movies.
It is not only a celebration of the Northern landscape, but also of the Nordic cultural heritage.

I will say, if you will only see one Christmas film this year, then it should be this!

I feel, even a hundred million stars is not even enough!⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Journey to the Christmas Star (Reisen til Julestjerna)

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Journey to the Christmas Star is a Norwegian Christmas Fairytale Film from 2012, directed by the very talented and magical Nils Gaup. This film is based upon one of Norway’s most beloved Christmas stories, featuring a wicked count, an evil witch, a brave princess, a missing star, and of course, Father Christmas himself.

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In the beginning of the film we are told the story of how the kingdom’s most beloved little princess got lost in the woods searching for the Christmas Star, after which, the king cursed the star, and both the princess and the star disappeared. Nine years later we meet Sonia, a sweet and brave girl held captive by thieves, but she manages to escape, and in her flight, she ends up in the castle where the king gives her sanctuary, in return she promises the king that she will find the Christmas Star for him, and so the adventure begins.

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Sonia embarks on a difficult journey, she is chased by the wicked count, but finds help in unexpected places. My favorite scenes in the movie are the scene in the Nisse house (Nisse is a Scandinavian faerie creature), where she is made tiny by little Moss in order to escape the count, and the scene in Father Christmas’ Tree garden where she learns that each tree is a soul, and the most beautiful souls grow lush and green whereas the wicked souls are withered and wasted.

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My favorite line in the film is in the beginning when Sonia is asked if she knows where to go to find the Christmas Star, to which she replies: Well, I’ll just go left. And when she is asked why left, her answer is: because that is where the heart is. 😊💖.

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I will heartily recommend this beautiful magical film to kids and grown-ups alike, especially to those who are interested in fairytales and faerie creatures from different cultures. You will get to eat a rich slice of Norway’s Faerie Cultural heritage in this adorable film.

Of course, five out of five stars! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

P.S if you want to read more about the Scandinavian Nisse, you can do so here:
https://talesfromthefairies.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/the-scandinavian-nisse/